Sept. 20, 2022

What is Success with Brandon Adams


Brandon T. Adams is an Emmy Award Winning Producer and Host of the TV Series Success in Your City. Brandon is a video marketing expert and advisor that has helped companies and individuals grow their revenue, brand, and high-level business relationships through video marketing strategies, in-person events, and TV production. He is an expert in video production, fundraising ($60 million to date), in-person events, and creating TV shows.

https://www.brandontadams.com

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Transcript

Josh Wilson
 Good day, fellows. Welcome to Uncensored advice for men. I'm bringing one of my friends I've known for a while. We met through Greg Roulette a few years back, and we wanted to get him on the show because he has an interesting story and he's also helping other men and people share their story. So let's kick off this call. Brandon welcome. Uncensored advice for men. Men. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 I'm honored and happy to be here, my friend. 


 Josh Wilson
 Yeah. All right. Behind you, let's just start with this behind you have some these little golden angels for people who might be listening in. You might want to go to our YouTube channel. He has some golden angels holding up this globe looking thing. What are those things? 


 Brandon T. Adams
 Behind me are four Emmy awards. Two are from our mine and two are my wife's. We won for different projects. One was Success in Your City, a show we did and then also for a documentary we did called Red Flags. 


 Josh Wilson
 Super cool. How heavy are those? I've seen them around. And when we did our mastermind at. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 All, I think it's about five to £6. I feel like I could be wrong. 


 Josh Wilson
 It feels good, right? 


 Brandon T. Adams
 Yes. Nobody's ever asked that before, but now I'm going to have to put it on the scale later. 


 Josh Wilson
 So, Brandon. Who are you? 


 Brandon T. Adams
 I am a guy that was born and raised in the middle of nowhere, Iowa, surrounded by cornfields that was an entrepreneur my whole life, from growing up in the family ice business. My dad sold package ice for a living to going on. I've always was passionate about sales and selling and making money in different ways. I went on to get into crowdfunding helping people raise money. So, like, doing different crowdfunding campaigns had some success in that, which led me to doing TV shows. Greg Roulette, he mentioned before and how we met, he came to me and said, hey, can you help me raise money for a pile of TV show? And I said, yes. I raised the money, became Chris Cook host. We created a show. That led to doing I've done three TV, four going on four TV shows now and then also a film called Thinking George Legacy. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 I've been a part of other, like, commercials and projects, but that would led to there. I'm an entrepreneur and guy that loves producing video content shows but also helping grow businesses. I invest in advising companies and help them grow. I like to make money but also do good with it. And that's who I am. 


 Josh Wilson
 That's who you are. Cool. In your journey, you talk about sharing your story. Why is story so important? What are you doing with those stories? Right? Does anybody really want to read Josh's memoir? Right? Yeah, kind of give us an idea on what that even looks like. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 Well, we all have a powerful story. When you can share your story effectively, it can impact other people's lives, inspire them, motivate them. Also there are people like whatever your story is, there's millions of people out there with probably very similar story in some way. Maybe not exactly, but in some way. You share that story with the world and let's say you do it through speaking to an audience, a podcast show or through a video that listener, that viewer. They listen in on that. They watch that. It makes them, for one point, if they're in the same position that you were at one point, they feel like they're not alone. Also, it gives them the motivation they need to keep pushing forward. Ian Hill give them the guidance and the path of what they need to do with their life. Also, from a business standpoint, it builds commonality, like, you're building, like and trusted people because they feel like they get to know you as a person and they're more likely to work with you. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 They're more likely to, whether it's by your product or service, donate towards your cause or just come to your concert, whatever that is. That's why I'm very passionate about it. For me, everything's about impact and how could I obviously make a lot of money but do good with that because I believe it's just paper. A day I feel we're judged based on the impact we've made on Earth. For me, that is what I found to be my way to make the biggest impact through helping other people share their story, but doing specifically through video. Because here's what video does. There is trust that there's so many communications, right? You speak words people hear. You see, people see, you feel emotion. Communication happens through hand gestures. It happens through a smile. It's proverbs when people see, your eyes are more likely to trust you as a human being. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 There's so much that happens in a video. If you can create an inspiring empowering, video editing music, all the different senses we have put into one and then deliver that to somebody, they watch it. That gives them this feeling that makes them do something with it. It's no different than think of a film you went to theater and watched and then it inspired you to go do something else. Right? Whether Batman or whatever it is. That's been my whole focus and why I think it's so powerful. I'm always looking to get better at it. 


 Josh Wilson
 Yeah. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 So. 


 Josh Wilson
 Why did you wrap up with your story? You're an author, you're speaker, you travel around when you choose sales and Business of Ice. Right. All your life story has built up to this, helping other people share their story versus why not just take your own story and run with it? I'd love to hear your thought process on how this turned externally. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 Yeah. Question is, how did I come the point of share my own story? 


 Josh Wilson
 Yeah, how'd you share your own story, but then now you're so focused on helping other people build their story. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 I do both. I'm always sharing my story because, again, I know it helps people. I went through so many different things. Also helps me master the storytelling process, but then helping other people. Here's what I learned. We did in 2018. It was right before I met you, I believe it was. We traveled the country to film the show called Success in Your City. My wife and I were sitting on a beach in 2017, and we said, what are we going to do next? I had a couple Tina Coladas, where I was a bun, it was her birthday. I said, why don't we travel the country? I had always wanted to live in twelve cities in twelve months. I had this crazy idea. I was 27 at the time, whatever it was, and then, okay, let's go travel in 2018, live in twelve cities. I just got done filming the show with Greg Rock called Ambitions Adventures, but weren't planning on doing another season. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 I thought, why don't we create a show my at the time girlfriend that became fiance and wife and go travel the country and have it be around. What is success? Live in different cities, learn from people, and really figure out what success is. We traveled and learned from professional athletes, to people that had a lot of money, people that had no money, to musicians, to business people, you name it. We lived in these cities and filmed this series. As we're doing this, we're looking at success differently. I'm looking at success differently, but also like, we're putting everything into it. I'm going through my own hardships along the way, almost lost everything and trying to pull the show together, wondering if anybody will ever watch it. We didn't live in twelve cities, we lived in six. We went through 43 states. But we filmed a five part series. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 Went to one city with the next live there, start all over. We're doing the casting, I'm doing the funding, we're doing the filming, we're doing everything. I started to really think inside and think, what is success to me? We got halfway through the year and we made a huge pivot. We sold my house, we sold everything we own. I sold a couple of businesses, I literally sold everything. We end up getting married that same year. That was zero when we want our percentage. We had in twelve months time, were like traveling the country. We're going through the amount of motions and experiences that some people don't experience in their entire lifetime. We did in twelve months. I share that because going back to the storytelling, we created this. We had our own story. What I did is we wrote a book on the story, The Road to Success. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 How to achieve success in business, life and love. We released the show and I saw how the stories we captured helped so many people. Also while were on set and filming with these people, I saw how it actually was helping them in the process of them sharing their story, almost like a therapy session, the camera was on, but there's a different experience when the camera is on. Once I saw what it did for these people and how once we released this, how much it helped other people, I said, what? There's something here. Why don't we help other people do the same thing? Maybe not through a TV show, but you're doing it for video assets or events where we show people what's possible with video. Do more of an educational side because not everybody's going to go and film a TV show. So that really kind of lines up. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 What brought me to even helping people share stories. 


 Josh Wilson
 That's so good, man. You mentioned, like, therapy with the camera on this show. Uncensored advice for men came out of a very rough time in my life. I started it because I was like, dude, I need a lot of help. At the time, I didn't have money for therapists, I didn't have money for coaches. I was like, I'm just going to go interview a bunch of coaches, ask them for tough advice. What happened is other guys started to go, I'm crying on my shows. I feel like I should have laid back on the couch. This show, as I'm getting helped, other people are getting helped too. That's the power of what you're doing. There's something real to this. There is just having conversations and sharing your story. I've had dudes cry on my show. I've cried. Like, it's weird, right? But there's power to the store. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 It's normal. 


 Josh Wilson
 Super normal. It is. For guys who like I used to consider myself a badass, that was not normal. For dad who is purpose, heart badass dude from Vietnam, not normal, right? In your experience, right, you're interviewing these people and you're talking about success. You kind of looked at success maybe differently. How did interviewing rich people, poor people, athletes, best in the world, what did that teach you about success? And what is success? 


 Brandon T. Adams
 It taught me it's a great question. It taught me that success is so different for different people. Really simply the whole journey we did on what is success, the answer is ask yourself what is success? In your time in life, because it's different when you're 18, 2030, 40, whatever. I'm 32, I haven't got 40 yet. There's different phases, whether you have kids or business or whatever phases of life. In that phase of your life, you ask yourself, what is success to me? Success being whether in your financial life, in your personal life, your love life, your relationships, your physical mental health. Knowing that most people don't even know what success means to them. They don't even know what they want. The first step is figuring out what you want. Once you figure out what you want, then okay, I want this. How do I get this? 


 Brandon T. Adams
 You have to put the steps in place to figure that out. The reason why most people never get to those achievements is because they never actually know what they want. They just say, but they don't actually want it. There's things like they'll say, I want a million dollars. I want this, I want that. But do they actually want that? And what's the real meaning behind that? Like, what is it that you want from that? Because that's what I've learned. I started challenging myself, was doing that show and experience. I asked myself, am I a success? Like, what is even me to be successful? I started thinking for me, and what it really turned out for me is, how can I always be the best version of myself? I sometimes feel like I'm slacking, yes, but I'm always striving to be the best version of myself. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 I'm striving to make the most amount of money. I'm striving to be the best husband. I'm striving to be the best person. Relationships, I'm striving to provide the most value, but also striving to master my talents and crafts and always trying to better at it. And so that's what I would say. What is success? What does success mean to you? Ask yourself in those areas, what does it mean? Okay, how are you going to get there? That, my friends, like, when you understand that, everything changes for you. 


 Josh Wilson
 Yeah. When did you have this revelation and what did life look like before that? 


 Brandon T. Adams
 Right after it was probably May of 2018. We just got done filming our third episode, Third City. We were in Boston, Massachusetts, and were featuring a guy that one time was homeless, and he was living on the streets of Boston. The guy, he was so connected to so many influential people, but he had no money in terms of, like, money is bank account, but he had access to people that had so much money, the access to so many things. But he was living happiness. What he was trying to do is create an orchestra. He was a violinist. How he made his money is he would play his violin on the subway, take that money, and that's how he literally made a living while saving that money up. Literally at that time, sleeping on the streets when he had money to get an apartment if he wanted to. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 He wanted that money to go towards creating this orchestra. We ended up getting, like, 30 instruments donated. He got a location that donates the location. He got teachers to donate their time. He literally created an orchestra from nothing, and he was willing to sleep on the streets. One thing he said is, you can do a lot with a little. I saw a guy that he was so happy, and so like, he had achieved his own version of success, but didn't have much money. I thought to myself, what do I actually need for material things? Now, I personally like, I have a lot of money, but it made me think about the things I really didn't need. That's when it really kind of hit me. What is success? It wasn't literally 30 days later, we sold our house, put it up and sold it, got rid of like were throwing out garbage bags worth of things in our house. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 I was selling things off the walls. I was donating stuff. I was getting rid of everything, because I realized it didn't really matter to me. It didn't mean anything to me. Once we left, I was in Iowa at the time, my house, remember when we left, it was in June of 2018. We're driving to our next city in Denver, Colorado, and what we had left was in our tahoe that we had, and then a small storage unit. Everything else was gone. As I left and we're driving on the road, I thought, wow, we're crazy. I thought, we really did go all in on this whole endeavor. That's where the pivotal moment for me and really understanding that whole journey. 


 Josh Wilson
 When you see a dream and when you look at success, or when you look at like, what a success for me? What do I actually want? What am I willing to do to get to that? Right? The guy's story, the violinist, he purged himself of anything, right? He had friends and influence. He probably could have got his insurance license and became a millionaire overnight because of his influential circles. He said, I want a symphony, and I'm willing to sleep on the streets for it. You looked at things and you said, this is what I want to accomplish. Story is important to me. I'll sell my house, sell everything, donate it, whatever. I'll purge it all, and I'll go all in. What did your friends and family say about you when you were going through this process? 


 Brandon T. Adams
 Yeah, I mean, well, it was tough because one of those conversations while selling my house was to tell my dad, who had bought a business from five years before, and he started 1986, so I had to sell the business. That was probably the toughest conversation, crying with him, because I said, I'd never do it. It was still part of my identity. I also knew that good business made money, but also it held me back. Even if it took 10% of my energy, it took 10% of my energy. And so that was difficult. When you're going after something, people are if you're really obsessed towards something, let's say you want to achieve any big award that's out there, whether it's award trophy milestone, money, accomplishment. You're going to be judged. You're going to be said, you're crazy. You're going to lose friends. You're going to be called obsessive. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 You have to be obsessive because if you don't literally burn the boats and go all in towards something, you'll never really become the best at it. Really, sometimes you got to ask yourself, what is the price you're willing to pay? You might question if the price is worth it along the way. 


 Josh Wilson
 Yeah. Is it worth it? 


 Brandon T. Adams
 Oh, yeah. 


 Josh Wilson
 You'll be asked that when you start getting rid of things and when you start selling things. I cashed out my government pension to go in on my dreams, and I went all in. Right. And it's that last 10%, though. You're selling your family business that's been around forever. Letting go of that last 10%, you're like, even if it took 10% of my energy, it took 10% of my energy, I find that letting go of that last thing, that last bit before going all in, was the toughest. What was your experience? 


 Brandon T. Adams
 Yeah, I mean, it definitely wasn't easy, but it was free once I did it. 


 Josh Wilson
 Yeah. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 Many people go, like, half a foot in. They don't just jump all in. When you close one door, another opens. When you commit 100%, I've been there in my life. Like, I commit to move to a city. I commit to move to an opportunity. I go all in. Here's the thing. In our minds, we actually know what's holding us back. We just have to conquer the old thought in our mind and actually say, okay, I'm going to do what I know I need to do. Most people will come up with reasons why to justify why they don't do what they need to do, and then they'll actually believe that on bullshit story. 


 Josh Wilson
 Yeah. Believe in your own bullshit, man. For a guy, I think it's one of the most dangerous things is believe in your own lies. When you say, we know what's holding us back. You've talked with thousands of entrepreneurs and you've videoed them, interviewed them, and you're helping shed their story. What do you find is a common thread for dudes of what's holding us back from really chasing, finding out what our dream is, but then really going all in for what our dream is? 


 Brandon T. Adams
 There's a couple of things. I mean, for one, probably the relationships that they're in, whether that's a marriage, girlfriend, boyfriend, or business relationship, or maybe they allow too much of it, could be family that influenced them in the wrong way. That's one side of it. Two, it's likely something from their past, some kind of tragedy or hardship or something that's so ingrained to them, maybe even from childhood, that they never actually conquered that will affect them for the rest of their lives. Ian Hill show their flaws and so they never do. Hit it head on because it's too hard to face. If they do face it'll be a complete game changer for them. Most people won't face it because you got to go through the gauntlet. 


 Josh Wilson
 Yeah. Facing the demons of the past, right? Facing and slaying the dragons of the past. What was yours? 


 Brandon T. Adams
 Many. 


 Josh Wilson
 Me, too. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 The big one for me was a couple. I was a kid, I didn't figure this out until I went through, like, this deep training. Like, they have the Tony Robbins and leash of power within they call landmark MIT. They have trainings where you go through, like, five days and development, and you do stuff that they don't tell you. Like, if they told you were going to do that stuff going into it, you would never go. But once you're there, you do it. And there's a reason there's a science. There's actually studies and science behind it. The point is, after going through that kind of training, I realized that in life, I was always striving to achieve something, to show my worthiness and show up and try to prove something to everybody else. That came from when I was a child. I was born with a speech impediment, so I had a list. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 At kindergarten, my teacher came and told my parents he needs to go to a class. To class, I did my s's rs all this stuff, and so I got bullied as a kid, and I didn't lose my speech until about probably 13. Who ultimately allowed me to lose it was I was practicing in front of the mirror every day as a kid, like eight years old. I'm doing this and thinking, like, visualizing and saying, I'm a success. I am great at sales because at that time, I wanted to be great at sales, and I was practicing SS, and I was actually visualizing myself. When people would come up to me, they would say, do you have a list? And I would say no. I would actually tell lie, really? Say, no, I don't know what you're talking about. Because I was actually and I didn't know the whole subconscious thing at the time, but what I was doing was actually working. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 And so eventually I lost the list. I share that story because me trying to proverbs I fit in, I was like everybody else, and that I'm worthy was because I wanted to fit in and speak like everybody else. That transcended into business and sports and everything. Yes, it did allow me to achieve certain wins, but it allowed me to do so obsessive about it. I never actually appreciated any win I had, and I was always going for the next thing, and I was always trying to prove it to everybody else. The whole point for me was to say, okay, it's all right. You did it. You don't need to prove. S*** to anybody, you did it. That small little thing really helped me realize, okay, I can do this in a different approach. That was my demon. 


 Josh Wilson
 Yeah, if you didn't fight that demon, right, if you just push it off the side and be like, whatever, I'm going to become a computer programmer. I don't need to talk with anybody. Whatever the case may be, those Emmys wouldn't exist behind you. All the stories that you shared with others and all the people that you've impacted wouldn't have happened. How do you look at or when you're talking to people about their own demons or about their own dragons? How does that now help propel you forward? 


 Brandon T. Adams
 Yeah, I would be single, I would be divorced if I didn't conquer those demons. I would be not a very good person because I still achieved success and rewards. But it wasn't like, fulfillment. Right? I'm not a therapist, but I try to share stories with people. It's not specifically just all through video. It's through conversations and share examples because I have interviewed a lot of people. You name a story, I've heard it. I will tell a story to somebody because I can't always share my own story because it doesn't always pertain to that person. If I do know somebody that has a story that can pertain to that person, that I can share that story, and how it allowed them to thrive in their own way in hopes that person listening will come up with the idea on their own from the story to do that change they need to do to overcome that demon. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 It's going to be more than that, but it's that, like, simple first step that allows them to do that. I've heard stories from people that have literally witnessed their family get slaughtered in villages, like, from people that have died and went in the afterlife and came back to you name it. I met him, I've heard them. And that's why, too. I always challenge people because they always say why they can't do something. Poor me, poor me. They might have a poor me story, but here's the thing. Like, okay, you lost your family. I'm sorry, but that happens every day. You lost this, you lost this. What are you going to do about it to make your life better? Are you going to live in sadness and defeat for the rest of your life? Or are you going to use that and live for that person? 


 Brandon T. Adams
 Live for that. That's how I look at things and I challenge people. Sometimes I may come off like, a little too much, but personally, in my heart, I have a good intention with it. 


 Josh Wilson
 Yeah, dude, when you're going through this journey of your own, what does the future look like? For Brandon? 


 Brandon T. Adams
 Yeah. For me, I have a grand vision and I'm constantly challenging myself to see more of the vision. It's big in terms of impact and influence. I put on events, I bring people together, I build well, but I have some very powerful people in my corner, which allows me to kind of skip the line to success, I say. So, as I do that, I always make sure my ego is in check, but also make sure I am going on the right path. Because you could go make a billion dollars and you could not be in happiness and success, or you could go achieve the most fame in the world and you may not be happy and success. I'm always kind of making sure that I'm in that. What is it meaning to me, what is success? And so grand future. I'm doing my own shows. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 I'm putting on massive event name, a part of massive billion dollar companies, some I'm already a part of, and I'm building out wealth, but doing good with that and finding new initiatives that can help the world. I think education is the biggest thing that is needed, that our system actually has failed. I feel like our education system sets us up for failure. Meeting systems, whether it's events or training that can help people, specifically when they're younger, to be prepared to live in terms of life, and this can be very challenging society. They say, what are you talking about? But it's a real thing. It's a real thing that needs to get tackled. And so Tony Robbins is doing it. There's other people out there doing it. That's one thing. Like, also striving towards as I say it out loud, I never really said it, but that's really what I'm doing. 


 Josh Wilson
 Yeah. So, I've had conversations with people and they're like, you need to be a coach. I'm like, dude, Tony Robbins is doing a great job. There's no need for another guy like Tony to be out there. And what are your thoughts to that? Because I know that there's a bunch of guys in the audience who are like, yeah, nobody cares about my story, right? It's a boring story to me. I've lived it. Yeah, I went through trauma, got my a** wolf, whatever the case may be. I don't need to share my story. It's boring. Nobody wants to hear it. What are your thoughts? 


 Brandon T. Adams
 So, my thoughts are two things. One, get over yourself and the reason why you don't think you need to share it. Because for one, if your goal is money, your goal is achieving more business clients and success and charging more, you're actually limiting your ability to make money by not telling your story. Secondly, you're actually helping people, and you're selfish about it to reveal you could be helping people, but you're selfish about it and you're not helping them. By sharing it and doing it effectively in the right way, there's two birds in 1 st. Not only do you help people, maybe save their life, help them achieve more success, but also you're allowing yourself to make more money. Most people just got to get over the fact their own insecurities about themselves. Don't get me wrong, some people, it's not going to happen overnight. Ian Hill take time for them to share their story, at least working towards it. 


 Josh Wilson
 What if their story included naughtiness in the past, right, where they did some things they're like, well, what if they find out now? I'll tell you, we have a bunch of different shows. I've opened Kimono Cold Wet Day and just said, hey, this is what I got, guys. That took a time for me to learn how to do and practice. Right. I'm not the best at it, but there's guys and I've interviewed stories and they've done things in the past that they're ashamed of. They've done things in the past that got them in trouble. How do you overcome that as a part of your story? What if you're ashamed of your story? 


 Brandon T. Adams
 Yeah. Don't share anything that might put you back in jail. Ian Hill say that there are so many lessons to learn. I got a friend, somebody I advise and work with that formerly addicted to alcohol and drugs. This life was a spiral and he was ashamed of it, but eventually he started sharing it and now more people can relate and he's helping other people. There's stories like that or domestic violence, but in terms of bad s***, we all make mistakes. How can you show, like, how you made the change? Because I imagine if you had did something really crazy and you overcame it, now you're here. There's other people that are probably going through that, and they're at a very pivotal crossroads in their life. If they hear your story, they might go right, which takes them on a good path. If they don't hear your story, they might go left. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 That puts them in prison or kills them. 


 Josh Wilson
 Yeah, man, it's so good. I found that guys have to learn to share their story because we're the protector, we're the defense, right? For us to open up, it creates vulnerability. We're afraid of the are people not going to like me? Are they going to be ashamed to be around me? Are they not going to do business with me? All these things, right? These things cross my mind when I'm sharing. It takes courage to share your story. How do you build that story? Give us, guys, some advice on how do we get to that place? We know we want to make more money, we know we want to create more impact, and we just feel this internal tug that we need to share our story because it's going to help other people. What are the steps to do that? How do we build that? 


 Brandon T. Adams
 Yeah. First thing you do is write down all the different points in your life, like, what are some big tragedies or winds or experiences in your story? What are they? So maybe you went bankrupt. Maybe you won awards for something. Maybe you achieved a milestone in the business. Maybe you got divorced. Maybe you lost a family member. Maybe you experienced hardship in some way, injury, whatever it is. Think about, okay, what this? Do I want to tackle you're thinking from a branding standpoint? I mean, okay, what do you want to be known for too? Because there might be parts of the stories that wouldn't make sense to share. What do you want to be known for? I'm known as a person that creates video. I'm known as a business advisor, investor, and so on the business side, I'm creating content that's sharing education and letting people know that's what I do so they know how to reach out to me. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 On the second side of things, I'm sharing journeys in entrepreneurship that I've experienced. I do share the speech impediment thing on my journey and that kind of form me into who I am. Also it showed how I really had to master the power of communication. Now I get paid a lot of money to speak. So that's one part of my story. I share the bankruptcy, almost hitting the bankruptcy story, because any very successful business person either went bankrupt or at one time they faced bankruptcy. If not, you haven't done enough business. That in itself, like, there's a lot of business people that are multimillionaires now that they can relate to me, and they know, like, dude, this guy actually has been through the gauntlet too. I can relate with that. And so think about that. What do you want to be known for? It really kind of forms into your own brand, right? 


 Brandon T. Adams
 And so that's really the starting point. The next step is to start recording content with your phone, turning the phone on, recording, press the record button and post it on social media. And you'll be surprised. You do your first video and you post on social media. How many people are going to be there, by the way? There will be some people could be family members because they grew up in a different generation where they're like, why would you share that? Why are you doing that? That's not the right place, which I disagree with. The other side is people are like, wow, you really inspired me today. You helped me get through this. Like, man, that's super amazing. They reach out to you and say, hey, I real estate with that. They realized that, oh, this is what you do for a living. They're more likely to go with you because you created that emotional connection between you and another person. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 People buy from human beings, they buy from other humans. If you're a human and you connect with our human and they just happen to do in business something that you need resources from, then they're going to be more likely to go to you versus some other business person. 


 Josh Wilson
 Yeah, that's super true. Let's play a game. I've got a stack of cards with questions on it. I'm going to go. You tell me you want to stop. Let's ask one of these questions. Stop. All right, here we go. I have no clue what this is going to say. What's the common trait shared by everyone in your network that you have chosen? Right. Like, we have friends that we grew up with or people that we dated in the past, but what's the common trait across all the people that you choose to be around? 


 Brandon T. Adams
 They don't have excuses. They expect a lot of people and they personally will get it done. They don't have excuses and they're always thinking big. Like, some of their ideas are crazy. That's how they got the crazy results. 


 Josh Wilson
 Yeah. It's so important to choose people with specific traits, especially after you're going for it. Right? Man, I got so many questions around that, but I think we're running out of time. Brandon, let's do this. During this interview, there's probably some questions that I should have asked you that I screwed up and did not ask, other than, like, how could people connect with you? We'll get there. I promise. What's the question you wish someone would ask you? 


 Brandon T. Adams
 That's a good question. I think more questions need to be asked about what goes in the mind of an entrepreneur that's driven, because it's a constant mind f***. It is constantly like questioning, and because time is a big thing, you think about it. I'm 32. I'll be 33 on New Year's Eve. I have a lot of things that go through my head, like a legacy, my happiness in this moment, but also knowing their sacrifice to get the happiness in the long run. You only have so many years, so how do you want to enjoy it? Because I know I can achieve anything I set my mind to. You also sometimes question, like, I'm going to achieve this, but will there be thoughts in my head of like, if I go after this, what am I going to lose along the way? There's these constant things, and I don't think people talk about that enough. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 For me, I know how I deal with this is discipline in my routines. I mean, I wake up, read, I pray, I work out. I kind of get those demons out of me. I'll go through my routine of my day. I keep consistent on my things, but I am constantly asking myself these questions on what is my success? Is it worth it? Am I giving enough? I feel lazy, even though I'm probably doing more than 99% of the people out there, which all successful people or people that have achieved things in life have. I think not enough people ask about that. I think it needs to be talked about more among these other people because they want to hold it in and they only have certain people, like they're going to talk about even me on certain things. Like you only can relate because not many people can understand it. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 Like I'm going to go to dinner with one of my business partners and he created the Infomercial. Think of this. He saw lines on the TV and he said he called the cable company and said, why I pay for cable? What's up with this? Oh, there's 6 hours of free time. He said, what? Can I buy that time? We bought the time. Within a few years, they took it all over the world. That's what created Infomercial. He became known as the Shark Tank guy and all this other stuff. That example right there is like how crazy people think that achieve massive wealth and success. I say that because, like hanging out with him, I actually can have these conversations because there's only like a handful of people that really understand he's one of them. Those conversations I value because it gives me more clarity and insight and almost happiness. 


 Josh Wilson
 I think that's the power of sharing your story, but also listening to the stories of others because a lot of times I'll listen to these stories, like I'm interviewing these people in you. And I go, man, yes, me too. And then I go. I'm not alone. I could also go, how did you do it? Right? You can listen to their stories, read their books, connect with them or whatever. With that, Brandon, for people who want to learn more about how to share their story, how to increase their brand, how to do all these things, where can people connect with you and get some help? 


 Brandon T. Adams
 For one, DMER at Brandon T. Adams and all social media, it's not hard to find me. For me, one of the big things I do, we talk about helping educate people, help them understand the power of sharing their story, and help them share their story. Do it through video is my wife and I put together event called Rise and Record. Really inspired from the TV show journey of success in your city and how we learn from other people creating that show. Rise and Record is all about helping you rise up and share your story specifically through video. Rise and Record is in Nashville, Tennessee. It's October 19 to the 21st. We got great speakers. Kevin Harrington. We got John Lee Dumas on fire. Sign of Leslie. We got the band do you ever heard of Brian Key? He was from Florida. Georgia line. He's performing speaking. 


 Brandon T. Adams
 I'm really looking forward to that fireside chat, by the way, with events full of speakers, education, networking, dinners around the city. So, yeah, go to Risingrecord.com, grab a ticket if there's still some left. It'll sell out, but that's where people can find more about me and get into my world and hang out with me. 


 Josh Wilson
 Super cool. Brandon, thanks for coming on the show. Really great to see you again, fellas. As always, reach out to our guests and say thanks for being on the show, especially if they had set something that resonates with you, connect with them. Their contact information will be in the show notes. If you have some advice that you'd like to share with other dudes or share your story here on the show,

Brandon T. Adams

Advisor / Video Marketing Expert / Speaker

Brandon T. Adams is an Emmy Award Winning Producer and Host of the TV Series Success in Your City. Brandon is a video marketing expert and advisor that has helped companies and individuals grow their revenue, brand, and high-level business relationships through video marketing strategies, in-person events, and TV production. He is an expert in video production, fundraising ($60 million to date), in-person events, and creating TV shows.